Euro 2020 stadiums (Euro for Europe)

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Tournament nameDesignConstructionCityCountryTournament capacity
Puskás Aréna See See Budapest 61 000
Wembley Stadium London 60 000
Baku Olympic Stadium See See Baku 34 000
Saint Petersburg Stadium Petersburg 30 500
Parken Stadium Kopenhagen 25 000
Stadium La Cartuja Sevilla Sevilla 20 000
Olimpico in Rome Rome 17 000
Johan Cruijff ArenA See Amsterdam 16 000
Football Arena Munich Munich 14 500
National Arena See Bucarest 13 000
Hampden Park Glasgow 12 000

Description

2020 European Championship in a unique format


After an extremely narrow loss to France over Euro 2016, Turkey was widely considered the favourite to host its own Euros in 2020, with over 20 modern stadiums being planned or delivered at the time. However, in mid-2012 UEFA president Michel Platini suggested a completely new event layout is being considered, with “12 to 13” cities across the continent.

Euro 2020, oficjalne logo turnieju UEFABy December the decision was official and “Euro for Europe” was announced as a way to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the very first European Championships. Because there were up to 13 hosts expected, the rule about hosts’ automatic qualification was abolished. However, in the end almost all host nations (with Azerbaijan and Romania being the exceptions) did qualify, even if for Hungary and Scotland it meant going through play-offs.

What are the stadiums of Euro 2020?


The new formula meant that each national football federation was able to select a candidate city and stadium. Aside from the stadia being modern, there was one major criterion: capacity. For major countries it was set at 50,000+, however a few spots were reserved for smaller federations, with stadiums of 30,000+.

In total, 13 match packages were prepared by UEFA, including 12 regular ones (3 group games + 1 knock-out game), while the 13th package was limited to the three most important fixtures: both semifinals and final.

There were over 30 countries expressing interest in hosting, however eventually only 19 decided to bid for hosting rights. Worth noting, France (hosts of the last edition) and Turkey (hopeful of winning a solo bid for Euro 2024, eventually losing to Germany) didn’t launch official bids. Along with Ukraine and Poland they were the largest UEFA associations not to compete.

Also, only two bids for the Euro 2020 final and semifinals were launched, by England’s FA (with Wembley) and Germany’s DFB (with Allianz Arena). London snapped the games, Munich had to settle with a regular match package.

Official selection of the host cities was announced in September of 2014. UEFA opted for the favourites, giving Western Europe and existing stadiums bulk of the 51 planned games. The winning bids include, in alphabetical order: Allianz Arena (Munich), Arena Națională (Bucharest), Aviva Stadium (Dublin), Bakı Olimpiya Stadionu (Baku), Eurostadium (Brussels), Hampden Park (Glasgow), Johan Cruijff ArenA (Amsterdam), Parken Stadium (Copenhagen), Puskás Aréna (Budapest), San Mames (Bilbao), Stadio Olimpico (Rome), Stadion St. Petersburg (St. Petersburg) and the aforementioned Wembley National Stadium (London).

The list means Western Europe received nine spots (of which three are within the British Isles), while Central and Eastern Europe only got four. Four is also the number of stadiums that didn’t exist at the time of selection. These were either under construction already (Baku Olympic Stadium and St. Petersburg Stadium) or planned to see groundbreaking within a couple of years (Eurostadium and Puskás Aréna).

An update of the list happened in December of 2017, when growing deadlock around the Belgian national stadium prompted UEFA to drop Brussels entirely. By that time delivery for mid-2020 was already unfeasible. Despite appeals to include one of the unlucky losers (like Cardiff or Stockholm), UEFA decided to award Belgium’s games to Wembley.

Euro 2020 map of stadiums and host cities

COVID-19 impact on Euro 2020


Because of the sudden outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic across Europe in early March of 2020, after just several days UEFA decided to postpone the tournament until 2021. It was to retain its 2020 branding despite the rescheduling. Also, the June-July calendar was retained (June 11 to July 11, to be precise), as well as the list of selected hosts.

Because of the pandemic being handled differently across Europe, the governing body asked all hosts to prepare for varying scenarios, from empty stands, through partial opening to sell-out crowds in the best case.

Eventually, in early spring of 2021, UEFA required each host to offer guarantees of being able to accept at least a portion of fans inside their stadium. The goal was to avoid empty stadiums as Europe was reopening.

Ireland and Spain were unable to present even such partial guarantees for the tournament, which prompted UEFA’s decision on April 23 to drop Dublin and Bilbao. While there was no replacement stadium in Ireland (Dublin’s games were distributed between Saint Petersburg and London), Spain offered Sevilla’s Estadio Olimpico, which was already well prepared to deal with events during the pandemic.

Tournament schedule


Group A

StadiumFixtureAttendanceDate (CET)
 Olimpico in Rome   Turkey 0–3 Italy   12,916 11/06/2021 21:00
 Baku Olympic Stadium   Wales 1–1 Switzerland   8,782 12/06/2021 15:00
 Baku Olympic Stadium   Turkey 0–2 Wales   19,762 16/06/2021 18:00
 Olimpico in Rome   Italy 3–0 Switzerland   12,445 16/06/2021 21:00
 Baku Olympic Stadium   Switzerland 3–1 Turkey   17,138 20/06/2021 18:00
 Olimpico in Rome   Italy 1–0 Wales   11,541 20/06/2021 18:00

Group B

StadiumFixtureAttendanceDate
 Parken Stadium   Denmark 0–1 Finland    15,200 12/06/2021 18:00
 St. Petersburg Stadium   Belgium 3–0 Russia    26,264 12/06/2021 21:00
 St. Petersburg Stadium   Finland 0–1 Russia   24,540 16/06/2021 15:00
 Parken Stadium   Denmark 1–2 Belgium   23,395 17/06/2021 18:00
 Parken Stadium   Russia 1–4 Denmark   23,644 21/06/2021 21:00
 St. Petersburg Stadium   Finland 0–2 Belgium   18,545 21/06/2021 21:00

Group C

StadiumFixtureAttendanceDate
 National Arena Bucharest   Austria 3–1 North Macedonia    9,082 13/06/2021 18:00
 Johan Cruijff ArenA   Netherlands 3–2 Ukraine    15,832 13/06/2021 21:00
 National Arena Bucharest   Ukraine 2–1 North Macedonia   10,001 17/06/2021 15:00
 Johan Cruijff ArenA   Netherlands 2–0 Austria   15,243 17/06/2021 21:00
 Johan Cruijff ArenA   North Macedonia 0–3 Netherlands   15,227 21/06/2021 18:00
 National Arena Bucharest   Ukraine 0–1 Austria   10,472 21/06/2021 18:00

Group D

StadiumFixtureAttendanceDate
 Wembley Stadium   England 1–0 Croatia   18,497 13/06/2021 15:00
 Hampden Park   Scotland - Czechia    9,847 14/06/2021 15:00
 Hampden Park   Croatia 1–1 Czechia   5,607 18/06/2021 15:00
 Wembley Stadium   England 0–0 Scotland   20,306 18/06/2021 21:00
 Hampden Park   Croatia 3–1 Scotland    9,896 22/06/2021 21:00
 Wembley Stadium   Czechia 0–1 England   19,104 22/06/2021 21:00

Group E

StadiumFixtureAttendanceDate
 St. Petersburg Stadium   Poland 1–2 Slovakia   12,862 14/06/2021 18:00
 Stadium La Cartuja   Spain 0–0 Sweden    10,559 14/06/2021 21:00
 St. Petersburg Stadium   Sweden 1–0 Slovakia   11,525 18/06/2021 15:00
 Stadium La Cartuja   Spain 1–1 Poland   11,742 19/06/2021 21:00
 Stadium La Cartuja   Slovakia 0–5 Spain   11,204 23/06/2021 18:00
 St. Petersburg Stadium   Sweden 3–2 Poland   14,252 23/06/2021 18:00

Group F

StadiumFixtureAttendanceDate
 Puskás Aréna   Hungary 0–3 Portugal   55,662 15/06/2021 18:00
 Football Arena Munich   France 1–0 Germany   13,000 15/06/2021 21:00
 Puskás Aréna   Hungary 1–1 France   55,998 19/06/2021 15:00
 Football Arena Munich   Portugal 2–4 Germany   12,926 19/06/2021 18:00
 Puskás Aréna   Portugal 2–2 France   54,886 23/06/2021 21:00
 Football Arena Munich   Germany 2–2 Hungary   12,413 23/06/2021 21:00

Round of 16

StadiumFixtureAttendanceDate
 Johan Cruijff ArenA   Wales 0–4 Denmark   14,645 26/06/2021 18:00
 Wembley Stadium   Italy 2–1 Austria   18,910 26/06/2021 21:00
 Puskás Aréna   Netherlands 0–2 Czechia   52,834 27/06/2021 18:00
 Stadium La Cartuja   Belgium 1–0 Portugal   11,504 27/06/2021 21:00
 Parken Stadium   Croatia 3–5 Spain   22,771 28/06/2021 18:00
 National Arena Bucharest   France 3–3 (4-5p) Switzerland   22,642 28/06/2021 21:00
 Wembley Stadium   England 2–0 Germany   41,973 29/06/2021 18:00
 Hampden Park   Sweden 1–2 Ukraine   9,221 29/06/2021 21:00

Quarterfinals

StadiumFixtureAttendanceDate
 St. Petersburg Stadium   Switzerland 1–1 (1-3p) Spain   24,764 02/07/2021 18:00
 Football Arena Munich   Belgium 1–2 Italy   12,984 02/07/2021 21:00
 Baku Olympic Stadium   Czechia 1–2 Denmark   16,306 03/07/2021 18:00
 Olimpico in Rome   Ukraine 0–4 England   11,880 03/07/2021 21:00

Semifinals

StadiumFixtureAttendanceDate
 Wembley Stadium   Italy 1–1 (4-2p) Spain   57,811 06/07/2021 21:00
 Wembley Stadium   England 2–1 Denmark   64,950 07/07/2021 21:00

Final

StadiumFixtureAttendanceDate
 Wembley Stadium   Italy 1–1 (3-2p) England   67,173 11/07/2021 21:00

Attendance

  • Total: 1,099,278
  • Average: 21,554

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