New stadiums: Mechelen, Charleroi, Leuven, Aalst

source: StadiumDB.com

New stadiums: Mechelen, Charleroi, Leuven, Aalst Not all too new, to be honest. Oldest one is over 90 and all of them show signs of aging. But that doesn’t make them boring, not one bit! If terracing is along the pitch while business seats behind goal, that cannot be boring…

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Achter de Kazerne

Argos Stadion

Built on site of former brewery, the ground was located Just behind an artillery garrison. Since then it has been nicknamed “Achter de Kazerne” (“Behind the Garrison”).

 Current stands date back to 1950’s, when the ground was still owned by KV Mechelen. The football side lost ownership after 98 years in 2009, when it went bankrupt and transferred their venue to the municipality.

The very same year first naming rights deal came with oil company Argos. Despite that old nickname still is part of the name.

Stade de la Neuville

Stade de la Neuville

One of the most famous grounds in Belgium and oldest that still exist. Built in 1920 it now looks like it did in 1937, when redevelopment was needed after Olympic de Charleroi first advanced to domestic top tier.

Numerous renovations were cosmetic – even the business section created in 1992 exists within the historical structure. In the 21st Century the ground has been constantly dilapidating. In 2008 one end stand had to be torn down for safety reasons, floodlight was found incompliant the same year, while in 2010 roof over one side fell down and needed repairs.

Interestingly, this venue stands just 500 metres away from Stade du Pays de Charleroi, home of Olympic’s main rivals.

Den Dreef

Den Dreef

Old track and field stadium in Leuven has been completely redeveloped in 2002, having three stands built from scratch and becoming football-only. Largest, main grandstand has two tiers, while all remaining sections are single-tiered.

Although this has been quite an extensive redevelopment, already in 2011 mayor of Leuven announced plans to build a new 20,000-seater in the city. If those plans come true, Den Dreef will have to be demolished.

Pierre Cornelisstadion

Pierre Cornelisstadion

Pierre Cornelis’ stadium was built in 1928, but back then it didn’t carry this name. It wasn’t until 1945, when legendary president of the club from 1930’s was honoured with patronage over the venue.

Currently the ground has three independent stands with a very unique division of spectators. Both home and away fanatics are located on the same terrace along the pitch, separated only by a buffer. Meanwhile corporate clients are placed behind goal – quite the opposite of what may be seen in most stadiums.

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