New design: Old-new home for Nacional

source: StadiumDB.com

New design: Old-new home for Nacional They’ve been using this place since 1900 and apparently want to spend decades more at Gran Parque Central. Nacional de Montevideo are launching a bold project to revamp their home.

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Gran Parque Central is 115 years old. And despite quite recent works to renovate it, it’s hardly the stadium to serve for many more years. Especially with archrivals Penarol building a brand new arena with higher commercial potential.

Estadio Gran Parque Central

That's why this scheme for Nacional de Montevideo was presented last year. It varies significantly from the plan of Penarol. Instead of building from scratch, Nacional decided to expand and upgrade their existing home to reach 40,000 seats with a light cover and smart, modest outer wrap.

Estadio Gran Parque Central

Nearly all stands will have parts of them retained and upper sections added, creating a massive wall of skyboxes (254 in total, 183 new ones), which are crucial to the project. Sale of the boxes is financing the project’s cost, while additional sections for regular fans, 450 underground parking places and numerous other facilities should improve matchday use and revenue.

In total this means adding 5,180 business seats and an entirely new upper tier of 8,226 seats. Altogether this will create a very tight bowl with atmosphere amplified thanks to the roof hanging directly on top of them. Two corners along the western side will be entirely occupied by premium seating pavilions, also holding themed bars.

Estadio Gran Parque Central

Initially the plan was contemplated as a one-phase development that would end as soon as 2016, but eventually a phased concept was chosen. Preparatory works for the first phase (south and east stands) began in June 2015, actual construction to follow in September. Remaining works are to be carried out as the first phase ends. The phasing is presented below:

Estadio Gran Parque Central

The stadium, if completed successfully, may become one of Uruguay’s host venues for the 2030 World Cup. Or so the Uruguayans may hope as the country is still unsure of filing an official bid. Should such a bid be submitted and win FIFA’s approval, Uruguay would host their second World Cup exactly 100 years since the first tournament ever to be organized by FIFA in Montevideo.

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